Wednesday, July 30, 2008

John McCain's 15 Minutes of Fame Are Up

Barack Obama Will Be the Next President of the United States.
Frank Rich says Barack Obama has already become
Acting President
by default.

It almost seems like a gag worthy of “Borat”: A smooth-talking rookie senator with an exotic name passes himself off as the incumbent American president to credulous foreigners. But to dismiss Barack Obama’s magical mystery tour through old Europe and two war zones as a media-made fairy tale would be to underestimate the ingenious politics of the moment. History was on the march well before Mr. Obama boarded his plane, and his trip was perfectly timed to reap the whirlwind.

..... He never would have been treated as a president-in-waiting by heads of state or network talking heads if all he offered were charisma, slick rhetoric and stunning visuals. What drew them instead was the raw power Mr. Obama has amassed: the power to start shaping events and the power to move markets, including TV ratings .... Power begets more power, absolutely.

The growing Obama clout derives not from national polls, where his lead is modest. Nor is it a gift from the press, which still gives free passes to its old bus mate John McCain. It was laughable to watch journalists stamp their feet last week to try to push Mr. Obama into saying he was “wrong” about the surge. More than five years and 4,100 American fatalities later, they’re still not demanding that Mr. McCain admit he was wrong when he assured us that our adventure in Iraq would be fast, produce little American “bloodletting” and “be paid for by the Iraqis.”

Never mind. This election remains about the present and the future, where Iraq’s $10 billion a month drain on American pocketbooks and military readiness is just one moving part in a matrix of national crises stretching from the gas pump to Pakistan. That’s the high-rolling political casino where Mr. Obama amassed the chips he cashed in last week. The “change” that he can at times wield like a glib marketing gimmick is increasingly becoming a substantive reality — sometimes through Mr. Obama’s instigation, sometimes by luck. Obama-branded change is snowballing, whether it’s change you happen to believe in or not.

Looking back now, we can see that the fortnight preceding the candidate’s flight to Kuwait was like a sequence in an old movie where wind blows away calendar pages to announce an epochal plot turn .... on July 15, Mr. McCain suddenly noticed that more Americans are dying in Afghanistan than Iraq and called for more American forces to be sent there. It was a long-overdue recognition of the obvious that he could no longer avoid: both Robert Gates, the defense secretary, and Adm. Mike Mullen, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, had already called for more American troops to battle the resurgent Taliban, echoing the policy proposed by Mr. Obama a year ago.

..... But it’s not merely the foreign policy consensus that is shifting Obama-ward. The Texas oilman T. Boone Pickens has now joined another high-profile McCain supporter, Arnold Schwarzenegger, in knocking the McCain nostrum that America can drill its way out of its energy crisis. Mr. Pickens, who financed the Swift-boat campaign smearing John Kerry in 2004, was thought to be a sugar daddy for similar assaults against the Democrats this year. Instead, he is underwriting nonpartisan ads promoting wind power and speaks of how he would welcome Al Gore as energy czar if there’s an Obama administration.

The Obama stampede is forcing Mr. McCain to surrender on other domestic fronts .....

..... but the sitting president, a lame duck despised by voters and shunned by his own party’s candidates, now has all the gravitas of Mr. Cellophane in “Chicago.” The opening for a successor arrived prematurely, and the vacuum had been waiting to be filled. What was most striking about the Obama speech in Berlin was not anything he said so much as the alternative reality it fostered: many American children have never before seen huge crowds turn out abroad to wave American flags instead of burn them.

Mr. McCain could also have stepped into the leadership gap left by Mr. Bush’s de facto abdication. His inability to even make a stab at doing so is troubling. While drama-queen commentators on television last week were busy building up false suspense about the Obama trip — will he make a world-class gaffe? will he have too large an audience in Germany? — few focused on the alarms that Mr. McCain’s behavior at home raise about his fitness to be president.
Once again the candidate was making factual errors about the only subject he cares about, imagining an Iraq-Pakistan border and garbling the chronology of the Anbar Awakening. Once again he displayed a tantrum-prone temperament ill-suited to a high-pressure 21st-century presidency. His grim-faced crusade to brand his opponent as a traitor who wants to “lose a war” isn’t even a competent impersonation of Joe McCarthy. Mr. McCain comes off instead like the ineffectual Mr. Wilson, the retired neighbor perpetually busting a gasket at the antics of pesky little Dennis the Menace.

..... the McCain campaign whines about its lack of press attention like a lover jilted for a younger guy. The McCain camp should be careful what it wishes for. As its relentless goading of Mr. Obama to visit Iraq only ratcheted up anticipation for the Democrat’s triumphant trip, so its insistent demand for joint town-hall meetings with Mr. Obama and for more televised chronicling of Mr. McCain’s wanderings could be self-inflicted disasters in the making.

.....

During Mr. McCain’s last two tours of the Middle East — conducted without the invasive scrutiny of network anchors — the only news he generated was his confusion of Sunni with Shia and his embarrassing stroll through a “safe” Baghdad market with helicopter cover....

The election remains Mr. Obama’s to lose, and he could lose it, whether through unexpected events, his own vanity or a vice-presidential misfire. But what we’ve learned this month is that America, our allies and most likely the next Congress are moving toward Mr. Obama’s post-Iraq vision of the future, whether he reaches the White House or not. That’s some small comfort as we contemplate the strange alternative offered by the Republicans: a candidate so oblivious to our nation’s big challenges ahead that he is doubling down in his campaign against both Mr. Maliki and Mr. Obama to be elected commander in chief of the surge.
John McCain is about to learn that the USA is no longer a country for old men to lead.

10 Moderated Comments:

Blogger Stella said...

Unless that old man was Mike Gravel...

:L)

Great post, Vig.

7/31/2008 10:45:00 AM  
Blogger the WIZARD, fkap said...

Nope. I just don't think John McCain's 15 minutes aren't up. Sorry.

And Barack Obama is going to need to learn how to be a leader if he truly wants people to follow.

Yes, Frank Rich has one pont of view, but the vast majority of commentaries I've read in the last two days do not follow this optimistic view. To many comments about Barack's ego. Even Frank Rich adds that caveat.

Nope. It's going to be a tighter election than I even imagined, unless.... someone makes a truly horrific mistake.

7/31/2008 04:26:00 PM  
Blogger Beach Bum said...

I don't know, if the economy stays the way it is, and we have no republican inspired "October Surprise" I still think there is a chance a strong majority could gravitate over to Obama. Maybe not a Reagan landslide but enough to quiet the republicans for a while.

7/31/2008 06:52:00 PM  
Blogger the WIZARD, fkap said...

Gallup Daily: Race Tied at 44%

My analysis of why this is happening [WARNING: You are NOT going to like this post]: Racing the Play Card

Sorry, I'm calling it the way I see it.

8/01/2008 11:21:00 AM  
Blogger Stella said...

In modern America, anyone who attempts to write satirically about the events of the day finds it difficult to concoct a situation so bizarre that it may not actually come to pass while the article is still on the presses.
~~Calvin Trillin

Well, OK, Wizard if that's the way you see it. But REALLY, Paris Hilton? I don't get the Obama-Hilton connection from McCain or anyone else.

8/01/2008 03:48:00 PM  
Blogger Messenger said...

Oh, Stella, it looks to me that this column was posted by Emily, not to Vigilante....

8/01/2008 07:52:00 PM  
Blogger Urban Pink said...

Another money shot!!

8/01/2008 10:08:00 PM  
Blogger Vigilante said...

Good post, Emily. Frank Rich is always worthy of consideration. I especially liked:

The election remains Mr. Obama’s to lose, and he could lose it, whether through unexpected events, his own vanity or a vice-presidential misfire.

Or, even through unexpected timidity.

Are you listening, Barack? Or is it going to be Barackis Dukakis? If that's what it's going to be, maybe we'd better bring back Hillary to put some steel in your back.

8/02/2008 07:32:00 AM  
Blogger Soros' Proxy said...

Hold fast Vigil. You were right the first time. Clark's the one. Don't second guess yourself.

8/02/2008 09:27:00 AM  
Blogger Vigilante said...

Yes, I rescind my last comment. Or, part of it. The HRC part.

8/02/2008 11:42:00 AM  

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